What are the Potential Effects of TBI?

The severity of a traumatic brain injury (TBI) may range from “mild” (i.e., a brief change in mental status or consciousness) to “severe” (i.e., an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia after the injury).

A TBI can cause a wide range of functional short- or long-term changes affecting:

  • Thinking  (i.e., memory and reasoning);

  • Sensation (i.e., sight and balance);

  • Language  (i.e., communication, expression, and understanding); and

  • Emotion  (i.e., depression, anxiety, personality changes, aggression, acting out, and social inappropriateness).

 

A TBI can also cause epilepsy and increase the risk for conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and other brain disorders.

 

About 75% of TBIs that occur each year are concussions or other forms of mild TBI.

 

Repeated mild TBIs occurring over an extended period of time can result in cumulative neurological and cognitive deficits. Repeated mild TBIs occurring within a short period of time (i.e., hours, days, or weeks) can be catastrophic or fatal.

For information on how to prevent TBI and the potentially serious effects from this injury, please visit TBI Prevention page.

References

  1. Taylor CA, Bell JM, Breiding MJ, Xu L. Traumatic Brain Injury–Related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths — United States, 2007 and 2013. MMWR Surveill Summ 2017;66(No. SS-9):1–16. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.ss6609a1 

  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Report to Congress on mild traumatic brain injury in the United States: steps to prevent a serious public health problem. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2003.

  3. Coronado VG, Haileyesus T, Cheng TA, Bell JM, Haarbauer-Krupa J, Lionbarger MR, Flores-Herrera J, McGuire LC, Gilchrist J. Trends in sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries treated in US emergency departments: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) 2001-2012. J Head Trauma Rehabil 2015; 30 (3): 185–197.

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Services include Housing Assistance and Options, Supported Employment, Pre-Vocational Services, Job Coaching, Independent Living Skills Training, Cooking Skills Training, Companion Services, Connecticut Brain Injury Support Groups, Recovery Assistants, State Benefit Assistance, Arts Program, Music Production Program, Media Production Program, Assisted Living Services, Hygiene and Bathing Skills Support, Homemaking and Cleaning SkillsGroup Day Supports, Disability Advocacy, Residential Programming, Specialized Private Pay Brain Injury Support Staffing Options and much more.